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Up And Running At Last
(Well Limping About Really)

The weather was murky first thing this morning but I decided to drive down to the plots and finally start some serious work, for the first time since my hip op. I loaded up the car with some netting, cloches, 2 kg of oatmeal, various packets of seeds, oodles of cardboard and some kitchen waste and set off at about 10 a.m. The first task was to level off the soil on 2 of the beds on N2 plot, which had been dug and cleared of weeds last year during the Dandelion wars. The soil was damp and sticky if walked on but I was able to rake and level both beds from the adjacent paths, without too much effort. Two days of not heavy, but persistent rain on Thursday and Friday last, hadn't caused too much of a problem with only the lower lying areas of the plots, which are shaded by trees, being wet underfoot. By the time I had finished leveling the 2 beds off, a little sunshine was sneaking through the thick cloud and drying out the surface soil, slightly. The Senshyu Onions which were overwintering, from seed, on N1 plot were then thinned out and re-planted into one of the beds I had just finished raking over. The other bed will be used for planting Onion sets into, hopefully tomorrow, if the Arctic weather which has been forecast holds off, that is. I then cleared the remaining Sprout plants from last years Brassica bed on Plot N1, dispatching them to the bottom of this years new compost heap, along with a few weeds from the same bed. The remainder of the bed was then hoed over, ready for later sowing and planting. Two rows of Peas, (Hurst Greenshaft), were then sown into this years Legumes bed on N1 Plot and covered with cloches, due to the expected cold weather in the next couple of weeks.
Senshyu Onions Replanted
Senshyu Onions Replanted

Peas sown and covered
Peas Sown and Covered
The recent few weeks of dry weather with heavy night time frosts had stopped the growth of many plants, I was grateful to see that the Creeping buttercups which had become invasive, on the drainage ditch bank and into some of the paths on N2 Plot, had been severely checked by the frosts, giving me some time to eradicate them at a later date. My Rhubarb plants were looking in good condition despite the cold weather and I will be harvesting some stalks tomorrow. The remaining Leeks growing on Plot N1 are still in good condition. The Welsh Onion and Chives growing at the top of Plot N2 are growing well, showing no signs of stress from the recent frosts. By mid afternoon it was beginning to splash with rain and feeling a little colder so I locked up the sheds and toddled off home, pleased with some progress at last.


Chives and Welsh Onions Growing Well
Welsh Onions/Chives Growing Nicely

Rhubarb Looking in Good Condition
Rhubarb Doing Well













There's always tomorrow!! 







 

Comments

  1. Glad to hear that you're getting back into action so rapidly. Don't over-do it though - no serious digging!
    I'm still putting off sowing (with a couple of exceptions), because the conditions are just not right. Snow again this coming week. Yuck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mark, nothing much to do here either the grounds frozen over today. I expect the rain will be back next week??

      Delete
  2. Funnily enough rhubarb suffers more if the windter isn't cold enough - according to the high priestess of rhubarb growers.

    WE're holding off on p[alnting on the plot just yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good idea to hold off sowing/planting for a while, if the weather picks up most plants will catch up eventually.

      Delete
  3. Things look like there going to plan. Glad your up and about now we have had more snow over night which has put pay to my plans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Stacy, I've changed my plans a few times since last January. The only good thing was recovering from the op whilst the weather was cold, (indoors).

      Delete
  4. Well done for being so busy after your op! Your plots are looking good. I really like your corrugated plastic cloches.
    I certainly have rhubarb-envy as so many blogs are showing great rhubarb! But not MY blog :-(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Belinda, I got most of the ground prepared before the middle of January. The corrugated sheets were screwed to wooden battens with washers underneath the screw heads to stop the plastic splitting. The materials were cheap when I made them, not so cheap now. Also if I made anymore I would leave the wooden end pieces off, so that the cloches can be stored flat after use. I'm sure your Rhubarb will pick up soon. Another 3 plants I've got are not as developed as the 2 in the picture.

      Delete
  5. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on headsmen. Regards

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    ReplyDelete
  6. Nice to hear you are up and about again - don't go too mad there's plenty of time to get everything done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Elaine, Good advice thanks, I still can't get a lot done again this week. I went down to the plots again today to attack the Dandelions but the ground was frozen solid after last nights drop in temperature.

      Delete
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There's Always Tomorrow!!